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08 Jun
2017

Airfoils: You Are Doing it Wrong

  • June 8, 2017
  • Guest HzAPg
  • 55 views

To be fair, I was at least doing it wrong-ish for many years, or at least, not as right as I could be. Allow me to explain – and yes, I’m dusting off this blog after many years of inactivity. I figured I would get things going again by going back to the very beginning, and pass along some of my updated thinking as it pertains to drawing airfoils in NURBS. In case you haven’t read it, here is my original post on drawing airfoils in NURBS.

10 Jun
2015

Free yourself from the insanity of Zebra analysis with Autodesk Shape

  • June 10, 2015
  • Dan Sawatzky
  • 49 views

So you’re working on your surface model, and you are trying to get everything to match up nicely, usually to either G1 (tangent) continuity, or G2 (curvature) continuity.  You think things look pretty good, you join them all together, you run ShowEdges to see if your model has any naked edges……and then you use Zebra to check that your edges are continuous in the way you desire.  Which, frankly, I think is completely nuts.  Allow me to explain.

07 Jun
2015

Why we build our surface models from scratch

  • June 7, 2015
  • guest_BGZvm
  • 13 views

Well, it’s time to dust off this blog and get it going again!  It’s been way too long.  Let’s just say life happens sometimes, but I’m glad to be back at this again.  So, to kick off the first post, I’m going to talk about something that we spend a lot of time talking to customers about when we build surfaces from laser scanned data.  We’re often asked, “Why do you use Rhino3D to do reverse engineering work, instead of one of the purpose made reverse engineering software platforms?” The short answer comes down to one word – quality.

19 Sep
2013

T-Splines Tip – Panel Line Breaks

I figured I would do a quick little step by step on making panel line breaks with T-Splines.  The first thing is to make sure that you have an isocurve, or isocurve loop that follows the panel line break that you want.  This sometimes can be tricky – in the case of this windshield, I did the topology layout with this in mind.  Here’s the loop of isocurves that I want to form the break on – it’s the junction between the main body and the front windshield: Now just run tsBevel, the options I use for something like this are: Segments = 5, Positioning = Distance, Keep on Face = Yes, Retopo Snap = No.  You’ll need to play around a bit with the bevel distance, in this case I found that 0.09 worked nicely, but you’ll have to adjust it for each model, depending on size.  Here’s what you get: Now select the middle face loop , and set your drag mode to UVN: Now just push that face loop inwards using the normal (blue) arrow.  I like to do it numerically, so that I can make them consistent.  I used a value of -0.05 here, but again you’ll have to play around a bit for each application. Now just run tsMakeUniform.  You should do this after every change in topology.  In smooth mode you get this: It’s quick, it’s easy and it looks good.  Can’t beat that!      

07 Dec
2012

It’s Raining Software!

Well after a long blog hiatus, I’m back and happy to report there are some exciting things happening in the land of CAD.  In the past few weeks there has been some very exciting news on the software front. First, out of left field, Autodesk suddenly announced it was going to resume development of T-Splines for Rhino!  The first news of this came from the T-Splines message board, where none other than Autodesk CEO Carl Bass chimed in and informed the community of the decision.  That pretty much made my jaw drop to the floor.  This means that there will be future releases of T-Splines for Rhino, with new tools and functionality.  Really, I truly did not see that coming.  Also, in the past few days they put out a release candidate for Rhino V5.  You can download that here.   There are some really nice fixes and upgrades in that release – most notably for symmetry and exact insertion of geometry.

11 May
2012

48″ Convair 240 – Wing Lofting

  Pecking away at the Convair 240 radio control model.  This is being done for a contest on the Ezone forums , and so I really need to get moving on this thing to get it in the air by June 30th contest end date.  The wings are getting there – mostly lofted, just have to add the rear spars and ailerons.  Having designed more than my fair share of RC planes in 2D using AutoCAD, boy, is this a better way to work!  The wings are going to be my favorite style – 1/32″ balsa d-tube leading edges with shear webs.  Super strong, super light, and very “stick and tissue.”  I’m going to try to get the tailfeathers and fuselage formers knocked out this weekend.  Haven’t quite decided if I want to do the nacelles out of balsa or vac formed styrene, but I’ll have to make a call on that pretty soon.

21 Mar
2012

T-Splines Tip – Panel Line Breaks

I figured I would do a quick little step by step on making panel line breaks with T-Splines.  The first thing is to make sure that you have an isocurve, or isocurve loop that follows the panel line break that you want.  This sometimes can be tricky – in the case of this windshield, I did the topology layout with this in mind.  Here’s the loop of isocurves that I want to form the break on – it’s the junction between the main body and the front windshield: Now just run tsBevel, the options I use for something like this are: Segments = 5, Positioning = Distance, Keep on Face = Yes, Retopo Snap = No.  You’ll need to play around a bit with the bevel distance, in this case I found that 0.09 worked nicely, but you’ll have to adjust it for each model, depending on size.  Here’s what you get: Now select the middle face loop , and set your drag mode to UVN: Now just push that face loop inwards using the normal (blue) arrow.  I like to do it numerically, so that I can make them consistent.  I used a value of -0.05 here, but again you’ll have to play around a bit for each application. Now just run tsMakeUniform.  You should do this after every change in topology.  In smooth mode you get this: It’s quick, it’s easy and it looks good.  Can’t beat that!